Poori | Whole Wheat Poori Recipe

Today’s recipe is a classic breakfast in South India – Poori. Served with a simple potato curry (Kezhangu), Poori Kezhangu is quite famous. I have fond memories of Poori from my childhood days. Mostly on Sundays, our Amma would set out to make Poori for breakfast. The sister and I would help her in rolling the dough into small circles. Amma would spread newspapers around us and we could make whatever mess we wanted to 🙂 Dad would be helping Amma with the frying and once done, we all would sit down together to devour the tasty Pooris. I wish I could go back to those happy days once again.

Poori 2

I was not a big fan of oily food growing up and that continues till date. It was the family tradition I loved the most as I realize now. As I have mentioned a number of times on this blog, the husband is a big time lover of deep fried stuff. Sometimes I wonder if I deprive him of the joy of best kind of food he loves, may be I do. Not only I detest having oily food, I hate making it too. Call it the fear of deep frying and the hot oil spilling or the smell of hot oil, I cant make this kind of food with ease. But Poori is one of the favorite things for my husband and I learnt to make it perfect for him. And you know, when things work out correctly, making these to puff up perfectly is easy and can be done in less amount of time.

Poori 6

To bring in a bit of health factor into it, I only use whole wheat flour and not all purpose flour. That also means that the Pooris are soft and stay like that for hours. There are a few tips to make any Poori puff up perfectly. First – never let the dough sit out. Prepare the dough and make Pooris right away. This would reduce Pooris from absorbing more oil. Make smaller sized Pooris, say 8-10 cm in diameter. That way, not much oil is needed for deep frying. Always, have little extra oil for frying and that way, not much oil would be absorbed by the Pooris. To get a great color on the Pooris, a tsp of sugar in the dough would help. The oil for deep frying should be neither too hot or too cold – maintain a medium flame all the time once after getting the oil hot. Press down the Poori using the slotted spoon to help puff it up. And one last thing – use a tbsp. of hot oil while kneading the dough. Follow these steps religiously, you would have fail-proof Pooris. So, here is the recipe.

Poori 4

 

To make Poori | Whole Wheat Poori Recipe

  • Servings: makes about 12
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Print

What I used –
  • Whole Wheat Flour, 2 cups
  • Hot Oil, 1 tbsp
  • Sugar, 1 tsp
  • Salt, as required
  • Water, as required
  • Oil, for deep frying

Poori 3

How I made –

1. In a large bowl, add whole wheat flour, salt, and sugar along with hot oil. Roughly mix everything together. Sprinkle water little by little and knead the dough until it comes together. Continue to work on the dough until it is smooth and pliable. It has to be firm and not too soft.

prep1

2. Cut the dough into equal sized portions and roll into balls. Take a ball of dough and flatten it slightly. Dust it with whole wheat flour on both sides and roll into a circle of diameter 8-10 cms. The rolled out dough should be neither too thick nor thin. Try avoiding dusting the dough with too much flour. Repeat the same with rest of the dough.

prep2

3. Meanwhile, heat oil in a deep pan. Once the oil is hot enough, set the flame on medium. Do a little test by dropping a tiny piece of dough into the oil and if it immediately raises to the top, oil is ready. Carefully slip a rolled out Poori into the oil and as it begins to raise up, press it gently with the slotted spoon. The Poori would begin to puff up, quickly turn it to the other side and cook until golden brown. Remove onto a tissue paper. Repeat the same with rest of the rolled out Pooris.

prep3

4. Serve hot with Potato curry (recipe coming up!) or Kurma of any type.

Poori 5

Note –
  • Never let the dough sit out or rest. Prepare the dough and make Pooris right away. This would reduce Pooris from absorbing more oil.
  • Make smaller sized Pooris, say 8-10 cm in diameter. That way, not much oil is needed for deep frying.
  • Always, have little extra oil for frying and that way, not much oil would be absorbed by the Pooris. A tip I have learnt from my mom.
  • To get a great color on the Pooris, a tsp of sugar in the dough would help.
  • The oil for deep frying should be neither too hot or too cold – maintain a medium flame all the time once after getting the oil hot.
  • Press down the Poori using the slotted spoon to help puff it up.
  • Use a tbsp. of hot oil while kneading the dough to get soft yet crispy Pooris.
  • Roll out all the Pooris and then set out to frying them all in a row, saves a lot of time.
  • Don’t dust the Pooris with a lot of flour while rolling – oil used for deep frying would be spoilt with burnt flour at the bottom. One can use a little oil if the dough is sticky while rolling.

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I am taking these wonderful perfectly puffed up Pooris to Angie’s Fiesta Friday #117. This is a weekly food fiesta where you get to meet lovely bloggers and their wonderful recipes! This week’s party is co-hosted by  Mollie @ The Frugal Hausfrau and Scarlett @ Unwed Housewife.

24 thoughts on “Poori | Whole Wheat Poori Recipe

  1. awww super. love the clicks.. We love pooris too.You know what, I prepare them vaandu’s lunch pretty much once in 10 days..Need to wake up half an earlier.. Never got a chance to click and take pics. Posted the kelangu recipe long long ago but poori yet to come. should try during weekends.

  2. I’ve successfully made these once. My daughter asked me to. She was reading this book at the time, The Conch Whisperer something like that and it must have talked about pooris. We googled the recipe and I made them. She was so happy! Of course we just ate them plain, without any curry. But next time I’ll make sure I have some potato curry to serve them with. Sounds delicious!

    1. Oh wow you made them! Awesome Angie 🙂 You should surely try these out with the potato curry – divine is the word 😀 Thanks for dropping by!

  3. My husband and I have been experimenting with breads from around the world for the last few weeks. It started because I can’t stand the cost of bread that is halfway decent here so I made soda bread as I always used to when I lived in Ireland. Next we tackled the flatbreads and have now got a little slough of recipes that we enjoy. He commented yesterday that we should make more indian breads since we enjoy (trying) to make Indian food (your blog is more helpful than you can ever believe) so I think tonight, to go with the dhal I made earlier we might try poori. I’m very interested in the fact that you use wholewheat flour and why Wish me luck – I’m a little phobic of fried foods too!

    1. Awwww thanks Osyth! I am glad my blog is of some help to you 🙂 I have been planning to make soda bread like forever now, may I should give it a try this weekend – thanks for reminding me! 🙂

      Frying in hot oil is scary really!

      1. I had lunch with my husband and some of his team yesterday including two men who I am very fond of – both Brahman …. I told them of your blog and his much I learn from you. Namaste 🙂

          1. I have promised to send a link to Nimesh since he enjoys cooking very much …. I think you will have more fans soon ???

  4. […] Poori, one of the classic breakfast recipes in South India is traditionally served with a simple Potato Masala curry called as Kezhangu (literally means Tuber as in Potato). Poori along with Kizhangu is a much loved combination. Growing up however, we have always had Pooris with Amma’s classic Green Peas Kurma or Masala. Given how both our parents were not fans of potato, making one simple non-potato dish was easier. Contrarily, S has had Pooris only with Poori Kezhangu as long as he can remember. Whenever he asks me to Pooris (which I listen to exactly once every six months), he only asks for this simple potato masala. It absolutely is not a problem for me, given how simple this potato recipe is. The not so spicy curry with creamy potatoes in perfectly cooked onions and hint of turmeric along with curry leaves, with tiny specks of carrots here and there – this is one of dishes that looks delightful too. […]

  5. […] Poori, one of the classic breakfast recipes in South India is traditionally served with a simple Potato Masala curry called as Kezhangu (literally means Tuber as in Potato). Poori along with Kizhangu is a much loved combination. Growing up however, we have always had Pooris with Amma’s classic Green Peas Kurma or Masala. Given how both our parents were not fans of potato, making one simple non-potato dish was easier. Contrarily, S has had Pooris only with Poori Kezhangu as long as he can remember. Whenever he asks me to Pooris (which I listen to exactly once every six months), he only asks for this simple potato masala. It absolutely is not a problem for me, given how simple this potato recipe is. The not so spicy curry with creamy potatoes in perfectly cooked onions and hint of turmeric along with curry leaves, with tiny specks of carrots here and there – this is one of dishes that looks delightful too. […]

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