Mysore Rasam | Arachuvitta Rasam

Step-wise picture recipe to make Mysore Rasam, one of the regional delicacies that is very simple to make. This Mysore Rasam is made with fresh ground spices and is very flavorful.

Mysore Rasam

I have posted my share of rasam recipes on this blog ranging with a very simple tomato rasam to comforting lemon rasam to exotic betel leaves rasam to medicinal pepper jeera rasam and here is one more to add to the list – Mysore Rasam. Like some regional delicacies, this makes its way into every meal in traditional south Indian weddings. I have always wanted to make this at home and no matter how many rasam recipes one learns, there is always space for one more. I followed this recipe (with very few changes) from Jeyashri’s kitchen and it was super delicious.

Mysore Rasam

The difference between this special mysore rasam and regular rasam is how the rasam spice mixture is made. Rasam spices are fresh roasted and ground along with coconut. It is this spice mix that makes Mysore rasam stand out from the rest. I personally prefer clear rasam recipes – the ones that don’t use any lentils but this one is an exception and comes together quickly for a simple lunch or dinner.

Mysore Rasam

I have to talk about this special cookware that I used to make this mysore rasam. Traditionally “Eeyam Sombu” is used to make rasams, for it yields much better taste. Eeyam in Tamil means an alloy made with lead and thanks to my Instagram friends, I learnt about this lost treasure and went on a searching spree when I was Chennai. My dad and I looked up so many stores and finally sourced it through a local vendor! I love it when my family plays along in all my kitchen craziness. I was specifically looking for this design and shape (depicting a ‘sombu’), luckily got the same (again thanks to my parents for taking that extra step for me) Needless to say, rasam made in Eeyam Sombu is unbeatable. It takes lesser time to make rasam, tastes far more better too!

Mysore Rasam

How to make Mysore Rasam –
Print Recipe
Mysore Rasam
Soothing and comforting Mysore Rasam recipe!
Mysore Rasam
Course Side Dishes
Cuisine South Indian
Servings
Ingredients
For Mysore Rasam Spice Mix –
  • 2 tsp Chana Dal
  • 1 tbsp Coriander Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Jeera/Cumin Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Black Pepper
  • 1 Dried Red Chilli
  • 2 tbsp Fresh Coconut
For Mysore Rasam –
  • 2 Tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp Cooked Toor Dal
  • 1 cup Thin Tamarind Extract
  • 1 tsp Sambar Powder
  • 1/4 tsp Turmeric Powder
  • Large Pinch Asafoetida
  • 1 tsp Ghee/Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard Seeds
  • Fresh Coriander Leaves as Needed
  • Fresh Curry Leaves as Needed
  • 2 cups Water
  • Salt as needed
Course Side Dishes
Cuisine South Indian
Servings
Ingredients
For Mysore Rasam Spice Mix –
  • 2 tsp Chana Dal
  • 1 tbsp Coriander Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Jeera/Cumin Seeds
  • 1/2 tsp Black Pepper
  • 1 Dried Red Chilli
  • 2 tbsp Fresh Coconut
For Mysore Rasam –
  • 2 Tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp Cooked Toor Dal
  • 1 cup Thin Tamarind Extract
  • 1 tsp Sambar Powder
  • 1/4 tsp Turmeric Powder
  • Large Pinch Asafoetida
  • 1 tsp Ghee/Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard Seeds
  • Fresh Coriander Leaves as Needed
  • Fresh Curry Leaves as Needed
  • 2 cups Water
  • Salt as needed
Mysore Rasam
Instructions
  1. In a pan dry roast all ingredients under “rasam spice mix” except coconut until golden and fragrant. Remove from heat.
  2. Add fresh grated coconut and let this spice mixture cool down. Grind into a smooth paste and set aside.
  3. Grind tomatoes into smooth puree, add it to the thin tamarind extract along with turmeric powder, sambar powder and salt.
  4. Heat this on medium flame until the mixture is frothy.
  5. Add fresh ground rasam spice mix along with cooked toor dal and add water as needed. Let the rasam come to a slow boil, it should be very fragrant by now.
  6. Meanwhile, temper mustard seeds, curry leaves and asafoetida in ghee/oil.
  7. Add it to the boiling rasam along with fresh coriander leaves. Remove from heat.
  8. Serve hot with a side of hot rice and ghee.

Mysore Rasam

Detailed step-wise picture recipe of making Mysore Rasam –

1. In a pan dry roast all ingredients under “rasam spice mix” except coconut until golden and fragrant. Remove from heat.

2. Add fresh grated coconut and let this spice mixture cool down. Grind into a smooth paste and set aside.

3. Grind tomatoes into smooth puree, add it to the thin tamarind extract along with turmeric powder, sambar powder and salt.

4. Heat this on medium flame until the mixture is frothy.

5. Add fresh ground rasam spice mix along with cooked toor dal and add water as needed. Let the rasam come to a slow boil, it should be very fragrant by now.

6. Meanwhile, temper mustard seeds, curry leaves and asafoetida in ghee/oil.

7. Add it to the boiling rasam along with fresh coriander leaves. Remove from heat.

8. Serve hot with a side of hot rice and ghee.

Mysore Rasam

Note –
  • Adjust the quantity of tomatoes based on the tanginess needed.
  • Additionally 1 tsp of grated jaggery can be added too.

Mysore Rasam

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Taking this to Fiesta Friday #218 and cohosts this week are Ginger @ Ginger & Bread and Julianna @ Foodie on Board

8 thoughts on “Mysore Rasam | Arachuvitta Rasam

  1. This looks absolutely stunning! I can almost taste it … Thank you so much for bringing this lovely dish along to Fiesta Friday! Have a wonderful weekend 🙂
    Ginger x

  2. I’ve always wanted to try my hands at Mysore Rasam, but never got a chance to do so. You tempt me to do it immediately. 🙂
    Love, love, love your eeya chombu. Kudos to you for doing so so confidently – I’m too scared to get one!

  3. I keep confusing rasam and sambar, which is which. Rasam is more of a soup, and sambar is more like dal/stew? Am I right? Every time I see rasam, I feel the need to try it. I’d better bookmark this!!

    1. You are absolutely right 🙂 And yes, you really need to try rasam – it tastes heavenly and there are many variations too!

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